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Patchwork

Sampling from one area and applying it all over the place will make it look pretty obvious that you've cloned something. You'll start seeing repeated shapes. For instance, if there happens to be a little dark area in the image you were cloning from, you will see that same dark area in the image you've applied it to. And if you look at it closely enough, you will see the shape repeat itself, which can start to look like a pattern. (You've just been busted cloning!) If you want to do this to fill in an area, you can go back and fix up the places that appear patterned by Option-clicking (Mac) or Alt-clicking (Windows) a random area around the place you've retouched, and then applying it on top of one of the patterned areas. But watch out—Photoshop's round brushes can be a dead giveaway, because you can easily pick out the areas that you're trying to disguise. This is a great time to use one of the odd-shaped brushes that appear at the bottom of the Brushes palette (Figure 16.47). These will provide better cover for areas that look obviously cloned. Another trick is to apply some noise to the entire image, which will make any retouching you've performed blend right into the image. To accomplish that, choose Filter > Noise > Add Noise, use an amount somewhere around 3, set the Distribution to Uniform, and turn off the Monochromatic check box.

Figure 16.47. To eliminate repeated patterns, use the unusual brushes found at the bottom of the Brushes palette.



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