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Brushes Palette

There are two versions of Photoshop's Brushes palette, each found in a different location in Photoshop. The one we've been talking about so far is the Brush Presets palette. When using that version (the “lite” edition), all you can do is switch between premade brushes. If you'd rather change the characteristics of a brush, then you'll need to abandon that palette and work with the full Brushes palette by choosing Window > Brushes (Figure 1.53). In this version of the palette (the “I'll take that with everything” edition), you can still access the Brush Presets by clicking on the words brush presets in the upper left of the palette. But you can do a heck of a lot more if you click on the choices that appear across the left side of the palette. When you do that, be sure to click on the words that describe the feature you'd like to change, not the check boxes. Clicking on the check boxes just lets you turn a feature on or off, and you won't see the options for that feature within the palette. To do that, you must click on the name, not the check box. By clicking on each of those choices, you'll find that there are well over 30 settings that you can apply to a brush. When I first saw them, it felt like I was going to need to go back to college to learn how to use everything. But then I looked a little closer and noticed that the settings aren't that hard to deal with, and that if you combine a bunch of the features, you can create some pretty awesome brush effects.

Figure 1.53. The full Brushes palette.



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