• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 4. The File Browser > Configuring the File Browser

Configuring the File Browser

The default layout of the File Browser lets you see where all the bits and pieces are, but it's definitely less than optimal for doing any real work. Fortunately, one of the File Browser's great strengths is its configurability. You can resize the palette area and the individual palettes by dragging the size controls, and display different-sized thumbnails using the commands on the File Browser's View menu. I typically use at least four different File Browser layouts for different tasks—see Figure 4-14.

Figure 4-14. File Browser layouts

The standard File Browser layout lets you see all the File browser elements, but it isn't particularly well suited to any specific task.

I use the all-thumbails view to sort images visually, as I would on a light table.

I use the Custom Thumbnail feature to make large thumbnails that let me compare two images at a time.

When I make initial selects using the Flag feature, I make the preview as large as possible and use the keyboard shortcuts to advance through the images and to apply the flag.


Of course, if I had to resize everything manually every time I wanted to change the layout, I'd be a distinctly unhappy camper. Fortunately, Photoshop's Workspace feature applies to File browser layouts, so I save each of my layouts as a workspace. To do so, I arrange the File Browser's elements the way I want them for a particular task, then choose Save Workspace from the Workspace submenu on Photoshop's Window menu so that I can recall each layout quickly.

I create each workspace with all the other palettes hidden, so the File Browser can use all the available desktop real estate—that way I don't have to waste time hitting Tab to hide the palettes. You can, if you wish, take things a step further by recording actions that let you switch between the different File Browser layouts using keystrokes—I'll describe doing so in detail in Chapter 7, Exploiting Automation.

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint