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Chapter 5. It's All About the Workflow > Working with the Cache

Working with the Cache

Four commands on the File Browser's File menu let you work with the cache in different ways.

  • Build Cache for Subfolders. Choosing Build Cache for Subfolders lets you speed up the initial caching of multiple folders of raw images. Copy the folders full of raws to an enclosing folder, point the File Browser at that enclosing folder, and choose Build Cache for Subfolders. The File Browser then goes to work building a cache for each subfolder. (Don't even try to understand the description of this feature supplied in Photoshop's online help—it's quite inaccurate.) You can also run Build Cache for Subfolders on a single folder, which forces the File Browser to build the cache modally. It's very slightly faster than just pointing it at a folder and letting it do it's thing, and it keeps you out of trouble because you can't do anything until it's finished building the cache.

  • Purge Cache. Choosing Purge Cache purges the live cache for the current folder. It has no effect on local cache files created with the Export Cache command. If you purge the cache and nothing seems to happen, it's likely that you've previously exported the cache to the local folder. As soon as the live cache is purged, the File Browser uses the local cache rather than rereading all the raw and rebuilding the thumbnails and previews.

  • Purge Entire Cache. Choosing Purge Entire Cache purges all the live cache files—the entire contents of the File Browser's cache folder—so use it with extreme caution if at all. However, like Purge Cache, it has no effect on local cache files created with the Export Cache command.

  • Export Cache. Choosing Export Cache writes a copy of the live cache to the folder in which you're working. Unlike the live cache, the exported local cache doesn't try to find the folder by path name—it simply applies to the folder that encloses it. If you plan to move or rename a folder, always export the cache first—that way, all the cached information remains intact. You should also export the cache for folders that are destined to be burned to CD or DVD—that way, the recipient won't have to wait while her copy of Photoshop reads all the images, because the cache is already there, in the folder on the CD. In fact, I always export the cache after doing any significant work in the File Browser, just so that I know I have a fallback position if things go wrong.


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