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Soft-Proofing Controls

If you're sane, you probably want to get some sense of what your images are going to look like before you commit to the $50,000 print run. There are three ways to proof your pictures: traditionally (print film negatives and create a laminated proof like a Matchprint), on a color printer (like one of the new breed of inkjet printers), or on screen. On screen? If you've been paying attention during this chapter, you know that you can set up your system well enough to start really trusting what you see on screen. Proofing images on screen is called soft-proofing, and Photoshop CS offers soft-proofing capabilities whose accuracy is limited only by the accuracy of the profiles involved.

In Photoshop CS, soft-proofing has its own set of controls, separate from the Color Settings dialog box. These allow you to preview your output accurately, whether it's RGB or CMYK. This is a huge advantage for those of us who print to RGB devices like film recorders or to those photorealistic inkjet printers that pretend so assiduously to be RGB devices that we're forced to treat them as such. But soft-proofing is a big improvement for those of us who print CMYK too, because we can soft-proof different conversions to CMYK while we're still working in RGB, and have them accurately depicted on screen. (For example, you can quickly see how the same image would look on newsprint and in your glossy brochure.)


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