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Chapter 11. Saving and Printing Images > Setting Preferences for Saving Files

Setting Preferences for Saving Files

The Saving Files portion of the Preferences dialog box provides a number of ways to control how Photoshop Elements manages your saved files, including options for displaying file extensions and thumbnail previews. There are some subtle (and not so subtle) differences in the features included in the Windows and Macintosh dialog boxes, but you’ll see those platform-specific features flagged within the procedure.

To set the Saving Files preferences:

1.
From the Edit menu, choose Preferences > Saving Files (Windows and Mac OS 9).

or

From the Photoshop Elements menu, choose Preferences > Saving Files (Mac OS X).

The Preferences dialog box opens with the Saving Files window active (Figure 11.5).

Figure 11.5. The Saving File window of the Preferences dialog box.


2.
From the Image Previews pop-up menu, choose an option to either save or not save a preview with the file (Figure 11.6).

Figure 11.6. You can save an image preview with your images that will display a thumbnail of your image in the Open dialog box of some applications.


When an application supports them, images saved with a preview will appear with a thumbnail version in that application’s Open or Place dialog box.

3.
(Mac OS only) Select the check boxes for the Image Preview options you want included with your file (Figure 11.7).

Figure 11.7. The Macintosh version of the Image Previews dialog box lets you save the image preview for a number of different uses.


Icon includes an icon as the file graphic on your desktop.

Macintosh and Windows Thumbnail include the thumbnail that would appear in an application’s Open or Place dialog box.

Full Size saves a low-resolution (72 pixels per inch) version of the file for applications that accept only low-resolution files.

We suggest leaving this last option unchecked, as it only adds overhead in the form of increased file size, and it’s the rare application that won’t accept high-resolution graphics files.

4.
(Windows only) From the File Extension pop-up menu, choose whether you want your file extensions in uppercase or lowercase characters (Figure 11.8).

Figure 11.8. The Windows version of the Image Previews dialog box lets you determine how you want file name extensions displayed.


5.
(Mac OS only) From the Append File Extension pop-up menu, choose an option to specify when you want file extensions added to your file names (Figure 11.9); then use the check box below to indicate whether or not to use lowercase characters.

Figure 11.9. On the Macintosh, you can choose whether or not to include extensions with your file names.


6.
In the File Compatibility portion of the dialog box, ensure that the Enable Advanced TIFF Save Options check box is selected (Figure 11.10). (In Mac OS X, you’ll see that the Ask Before Saving Layered TIFF files and Maximize Compatibility for Photoshop PSD Files check boxes are already selected.)

Figure 11.10. The number of save options that the TIFF format dialog box displays can be controlled from the Saving Files preferences.


This is a Photoshop Elements default and ensures that the maximum number of compatibility and saving options is always available to you.

7.
In the Recent File List Contains text box, enter a number from 1 to 30 (Figure 11.11).

Figure 11.11. Specify the number of file names that are displayed when you choose Open Recent from the File menu.


This designates the number of file names available to you when you select Open Recent from the File menu.

8.
Click OK to close the dialog box and apply your preferences settings.


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