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Chapter 8. Color Correction > The Digital Version of Color

The Digital Version of Color

Now let's see how all of this colorful information relates to digital imaging. To display color, your computer monitor uses tiny bars of red, green, and blue light, all smashed together. They are so small your eye can't focus on any one of them individually, but together they create the spectrum of colors you see on your screen (Figure 8.4). That's why your monitor can display a wide range of colors using only three colors of light. A scanner works the same way. It's just like our apple example—the scanner shines light on something and measures how much RGB light bounces off. Then that data is used to determine how much RGB light your monitor should use to display that color and, therefore, how much RGB light will enter your eye. See how it really is an RGB world out there?

Figure 8.4. If you look closely at your monitor, you'll that see everything it displays is made from red, green, and blue light.



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