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Lesson 4. Painting and Editing > Correcting your work

Correcting your work

As you work on an image, you may want to undo an operation or correct a mistake. There are many ways to correct mistakes in Adobe Photoshop. In the following sections, you'll use the History palette, eraser tool, and history brush tools to revert your image to an earlier state.

Using the History palette

You can use the History palette to revert to a previous state of an image, to delete an image's states, and in Adobe Photoshop, to create a document from a state or snapshot.

1.
Paint a few strokes with the paintbrush above the flowers in the image.

2.
If the History palette is not showing, choose Window > History to display it.

Each stroke that you painted with the paintbrush is listed as a state in the History palette with the most recent state listed at the bottom.

3.
In the History palette, select the Paintbrush state above the most recent state (at the bottom).



Notice that the last stroke you painted disappears in the image. You can select different Paintbrush states to step forward or backward in the history of the image.

Note

For more information about the History palette, see Photoshop 6.0 online Help.

Using the eraser tool

The eraser tool changes pixels in the image as you drag through them. If you're working in the background or in a layer with transparency locked, the pixels change to the background color; otherwise, the pixels are erased to transparency. You can also use the eraser to return the affected area to a state selected in the History palette.

1.
Select the eraser tool ( ).

Options for the eraser tool appear in the tool options bar.

2.
Drag the eraser tool over one of your paintbrush strokes.

Notice that an Eraser state is added to the History palette.


State of the eraser tool in Paintbrush mode added to the History palette.


3.
In the tool options bar, choose a Brush size for the eraser, and enter a value of about 10% to 20% for the opacity.

The reduced opacity of the eraser tool produces a subtle effect when applying the tool.

You can also change the mode of the eraser from Paintbrush mode to Airbrush, Pencil, or Block mode. Changing to a different tool mode allows the eraser tool to erase using the attributes of the specified tool.

4.
Drag the eraser tool over another paintbrush stroke.

Notice that the eraser tool softens the paintbrush stroke.

5.
In the History palette, select the last state that you want to continue with.

6.
Choose File > Save.

Using the history tools

The history tools paint strokes based on the selected state or snapshot in the History palette. In this section, you'll work with both history tools-the art history brush tool and the history brush tool.

The art history brush tool paints with a stylized stroke simulating the look of different paint styles.

1.
In the History palette, click the Create New Snapshot button ( ).

A snapshot state appears at the top of the History palette.



2.
In the Layers palette, select the Lily Image layer.

3.
Select the art history brush tool ( ) hidden under the history brush tool ( ).



4.
In the tool options bar, choose a small brush size (such as Hard Round 3 Pixels) and choose an option from the Style menu (such as Tight Long).

5.
Using the art history brush tool, paint over the dark lines of the flowers and leaves. You can also experiment with just clicking on an area rather than dragging.

6.
Choose a different style in the tool options bar and paint some more.


Before and after painting with the art history brush tool


The history brush tool paints a copy of the selected state or snapshot into the current image window. You'll use the history brush tool to remove the strokes you made with the art history brush tool—without affecting the original dark lines of the Lily Image layer. You'll also set the source for the history brush to be the snapshot you created at the beginning of this section.

7.
Click in the empty box at the left of the Snapshot 1 thumbnail.

An icon ( ) appears in the box, indicating that each stroke you make with the history brush tool will remove a state from the History palette that occurred after Snapshot 1 was created.



8.
Select the history brush tool ( ) and drag over the areas in the image that you painted with the art history brush tool.

Notice that the strokes you make with the history brush tool remove the strokes that you made with the art history brush tool and uncover the original dark lines of the image.

9.
In the History palette, select the snapshot state that you created earlier.

10.
Choose File > Save.

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