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Chapter 11. Decision-Making The Root of ... > The Eight Decision-Making Styles - Pg. 113

Decision-Making The Root of All Action 113 Little League Decisions Our daily lives are filled with micro decisions, the little decisions we don't even notice we're making but that we usually have to make in order to get anything done. Should you give your child bananas or peaches for breakfast this morning? Will you wear the red tie or the yellow one? At the office, do you answer e-mails or make phone calls first? Most of these are not life or death decisions, but they can seem that way for people who find decision-making in general difficult. Although these decisions may not be as significant as the major league ones, letting yourself get stressed out over too many little decisions day after day adds up to one big problem. Not only does doing so drain your mental energy (energy you need for more important matters), it also keeps your life in a constant state of disarray. By wasting too much time fretting over the small stuff, you're likely to become disorganized and fall behind on more critical tasks in the process. The Eight Decision-Making Styles Each of our brains is wired differently when it comes to decision-making. In order to start making better decisions or to stop putting off making them at all, you need to understand your natural de- cision-making style. The styles described in this section are based loosely on personality dimensions identified by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, C.G. Jung, and popularized by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a per- sonality test administered by career and mental health counselors. As you read through the eight decision-making styles that follow (described in four pairings of opposite styles), be thinking about how each does or does not describe you.