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Chapter 5. CRIMINAL IDENTITY THEFT,TAXES... > Criminal Misidentification

Criminal Misidentification

Usually, when you hear a professional athlete discussing his contract say “Its not about the money,” there is one thing of which you can be sure—it's about the money. But when it comes to identity theft, it often is not about the money. The problems encountered by someone whose identity has been stolen by a criminal, who then commits crimes in the name of the identity theft victim, are substantial. They involve much more than money.

Hoisted with His Own Petard

James Perry, being concerned that his four drunk driving convictions in Florida would interfere with his application for a Connecticut driver's license, stole the identity of his neighbor, Robert Kowalski. Perry managed to get a Connecticut driver's license and credit cards in the name of Robert Kowalski. Everything was going fine for Perry until he was arrested on a minor disorderly conduct charge. In accordance with standard operating procedure, Kowalski's name was put through a background check for outstanding warrants, and the search indicated that Robert Kowalski was a convicted sex offender who had failed to register in Connecticut as required by state law. Suddenly James Perry decided that it was better to be James Perry than Robert Kowalski and he confessed to his crime. An FBI fingerprint check confirmed his true identity, and he was promptly charged with criminal impersonation.


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