• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part Three: Common Biases and Errors Tha... > I’ll See It When I Believe It: The S...

Chapter Sixteen. I’ll See It When I Believe It: The Selective Perception Bias

It isn’t that they can’t see the solution.

It’s that they can’t see the problem.

G.K. Chesterton

The following represents a classic study in perception. Twenty-three middle-level managers were asked to read a comprehensive case describing the operational activities in a steel company.[1] Six of the 23 executives worked in the area of sales, five in production, four in accounting, and eight in miscellaneous functions. After reading the case, each of these executives was then asked to identify the problem a new company president should deal with first. Eighty-three percent of the sales executives rated sales most important, but only 29 percent of the others did. Similarly, the production executives gave priority to the production area, and the accounting people focused on accounting problems. These findings led to the conclusion that these participants interpreted the cases’ priorities in terms of the activities and goals of the functional areas to which the executives were attached. That is, the perception of organizational activities was selectively interpreted by these executives in response to their experience, training, and vested interests.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint