• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 11. Monitoring Your Sociocentric... > The Nature of Sociocentrism

The Nature of Sociocentrism

All of us, to varying degrees, uncritically accept as right and correct whatever ways of acting and believing are fostered in the social groups to which we belong (Figure 11.1). This becomes clear to us if we reflect on what happens when, say, an adolescent joins an urban street gang. With that act, adolescents are expected to identify themselves with:

  • A name that defines who and what they are;

  • A way of talking;

  • A set of friends and enemies;

  • Gang rituals in which they must participate;

  • Expected behaviors involving fellow gang members;

  • Expected behaviors when around the enemies of the gang;

  • A hierarchy of power within the gang;

  • A way of dressing and speaking;

  • Social requirements to which every gang member must conform;

  • A set of taboos—forbidden acts that every gang member must studiously avoid under threat of severe punishment.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint