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Chapter 21. Implementing Windows Vista’s... > Understand Internet Explorer’s Advan...

Understand Internet Explorer’s Advanced Security Options

To close our look at Windows Vista’s web security features, this section takes you through Internet Explorer’s Advanced security options. Select Tools, Internet Options, display the Advanced tab, and then scroll down to the Security section to see the following options:.

  • Allow Active Content from CDs to Run on My Computer— Leave this check box deactivated to prevent active content such as scripts and controls located in CD-based web pages to execute on your computer. However, if you have a CD-based program that won’t function, you might need to activate this check box to enable the program to work properly.

  • Allow Active Content to Run in Files on My Computer— Leave this check box deactivated to prevent active content such as scripts and controls located in local web pages to execute on your computer. If you’re testing a web page that includes active content, activate this check box so that you can test the web pages locally.

  • Allow Software to Run or Install Even If the Signature Is Invalid— Leave this check box deactivated to avoid running or installing software that doesn’t have a valid digital signature. If you can’t get a program to run or install, consider activating this check box.

  • Check for Publisher’s Certificate Revocation— When this option is activated, Internet Explorer examines a site’s digital security certificates to see whether they have been revoked.

  • Check for Server Certificate Revocation (Requires Restart)— If you activate this option, Internet Explorer also checks the security certificate for the web page’s server.

  • Check for Signatures on Downloaded Programs— If you activate this check box, Internet Explorer checks for a digital signature on any program that you download.

  • Do Not Save Encrypted Pages to Disk— If you activate this option, Internet Explorer won’t store encrypted files in the Temporary Internet Files folder.

  • Empty Temporary Internet Files Folder When Browser Is Closed— With this option activated, Internet Explorer removes all files from the Temporary Internet Files folder when you exit the program.

  • Enable Integrated Windows Authentication— With this check box activated, Internet Explorer uses Integrated Windows Authentication (formerly known as Windows NT Challenge/Response Authentication) to attempt to log on to a restricted site. This means the browser attempts to log on using the current credentials from the user’s network domain logon. If this doesn’t work, Internet Explorer displays a dialog box prompting the user for a username and password.

  • Enable Native XMLHTTP Support— With this check box activated, Internet Explorer works properly with sites that use the XMLHTTPRequest API to transfer XML data between the browser and a server. This API is most commonly used in Ajax-powered sites. Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a web development technique that creates sites that operate much like desktop programs. In particular, the XMLHTTPRequest API enables the browser to request and accept data from the server without reloading the page.

  • Phishing Filter— This item offers three option buttons:

    Disable Phishing Filter— Click this option to shut off the Phishing Filter.

    Turn Off Automatic Website Checking— Click this option to tell Internet Explorer not to check each site to determine whether it’s a suspicious or a known phishing site. Internet Explorer displays a Phishing Filter icon in the status bar, and you can click that icon to check the current site.

    Turn On Automatic Website Checking— Click this option to tell Internet Explorer to check each site to determine whether it’s a suspicious or a known phishing site.

  • Use SSL 2.0— This check box toggles support for the Secure Sockets Layer Level 2 security protocol on and off. This version of SSL is currently the Web’s standard security protocol.

  • Use SSL 3.0— This check box toggles support for SSL Level 3 on and off. SSL 3.0 is more secure than SSL 2.0 (it can authenticate both the client and the server), but isn’t currently as popular as SSL 2.0.

  • Use TLS 1.0— This check box toggles support for Transport Layer Security (TLS) on and off. This is a relatively new protocol, so few websites implement it.

  • Warn About Certificate Address Mismatch— When activated, this option tells Internet Explorer to display a warning dialog box if a site is using an invalid digital security certificate.

  • Warn If Changing Between Secure and Not Secure Mode— When activated, this option tells Internet Explorer to display a warning dialog box whenever you enter and leave a secure site.

  • Warn If POST Submittal Is Redirected to a Zone That Does Not Permit Posts— When activated, this option tells Internet Explorer to display a warning dialog box if a form submission is sent to a site other than the one hosting the form.


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