• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 22. Setting Up a Small Network > Connecting to a Nonbroadcasting Wirele...

Connecting to a Nonbroadcasting Wireless Network

You saw earlier that each wireless network has a network name: the Service Set Identifier, or SSID. The SSID identifies the network to wireless devices and computers with wireless network cards. By default, most wireless networks broadcast the network name so that you can see the network and connect to it. However, some wireless networks disable network name broadcasting as a security precaution. The idea is that if unauthorized users can’t see the network, they can’t attempt to connect to it.

Caution

You disable SSID broadcasting by accessing the wireless access point’s configuration page and deactivating the broadcast setting. (Exactly how you do that varies depending on the manufacturer; see your documentation or just poke around in the settings page.) However, when previously authorized devices attempt to connect to a nonbroadcasting network, they include the network’s SSID as part of the probe requests they send out to see whether the network is within range. The SSID is sent in unencrypted text, so it would be easy for a snoop with the right software (easily obtained from the Internet) to learn the SSID. If the SSID is not broadcasting to try to hide a network that is unsecure or uses an easily breakable encryption protocol, such as WEP, hiding the SSID in this way actually makes the network less secure.



PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint