• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 14. Tuning Windows Vista’s Performance > Customizing the Page File Size

Customizing the Page File Size

By default, Windows Vista sets the initial size of the page file to 1.5 times the amount of RAM in your system, and it set the maximum size of the page file to 3 times the amount of RAM. For example, on a system with 256MB RAM, the page file’s initial size will be 384MB and its maximum size will be 768MB. The default values work well on most systems, but you might want to customize these sizes to suit your own configuration. Here are some notes about custom page file sizes:

  • The less RAM you have, the more likely it is that Windows Vista will use the page file, so the Windows Vista default page file sizes make sense. If your computer has less than 1GB RAM, you should leave the page file sizes as is.

  • The more RAM you have, the less likely it is that Windows Vista will use the page file. Therefore, the default initial page file size is too large and the disk space reserved by Windows Vista is wasted. On systems with 512MB RAM or more, you should set the initial page file size to half the RAM size, but leave the maximum size at three times the amount of RAM, just in case.

  • If disk space is at a premium and you can’t move the page file to a drive with more free space, set the initial page file size to 2MB (the minimum size supported by Windows Vista). This should eventually result in the smallest possible page file, but you’ll see a bit of a performance drop because Windows Vista will often have to increase the size the page file dynamically as you work with your programs.

  • You might think that setting the initial size and the maximum size to the same relatively large value (say, two or three times RAM) would improve performance because it would mean that Windows Vista would never resize the page file. In practice, however, it has been shown that this trick does not improve performance, and in some cases actually decreases performance.

  • If you have a large amount of RAM (at least 1GB), you might think that Windows Vista would never need virtual memory, so it would be okay to turn off the page file. This won’t work, however, because Windows Vista needs the page file anyway, and some programs might crash if no virtual memory is present.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint