• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 16. The Internet > How AppleShare IP Works

How AppleShare IP Works

AppleTalk is a network communication protocol just like TCP/IP or UDP. LocalTalk, a bunch of cables with weird end connectors, is yet another cabling scheme just like Ethernet. The AppleTalk protocol runs on LocalTalk, Ethernet, and many other network interfaces. Until the iMac, other G3 Macs, and today’s G4 systems, all Macintosh systems came with a LocalTalk port, which has now been replaced by standard RJ-45 ports for connectivity to standard Ethernet networks. LocalTalk was great in its day because it provided a quick, plug-and-play solution for networking Macs that was forgiving of errors in network communications, but it is incredibly slow by today’s standards.

Macintosh systems that have only LocalTalk connectors must communicate using AppleTalk, because that is the only protocol supported on a LocalTalk cable. To communicate with systems that understand only TCP/IP, Macintosh systems use software such as MacIP to encapsulate TCP/IP packets inside AppleTalk packets and then send them to an AppleTalk router, which can be as simple as a LocalTalk-to-10Base-T adapter that plugs into a LocalTalk or printer port on the Mac. Devices such as these unwrap the AppleTalk envelope and forward the packet as plain TCP/IP onto the Ethernet. Returning packets from the TCP/IP destination are repackaged into AppleTalk packets and sent back to the LocalTalk Mac.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint