• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Upgrading Your Hardware

Some of us are content to use our computer as it comes out of the box, and are happy enough if it just turns on and manages to boot up. Others are like hot-rod enthusiasts and fuss over each component in our machines, replacing one part after another in an obsession to have the fastest, the slickest, and the most impressive technology. And all of us eventually realize that our once amazingly fast computer is starting to feel kind of clunky next to the ones we see our friends and coworkers using. Whatever your obsession level, you'll want to read this chapter for advice on making hardware changes—large or small—to get the most work and useful life out of your computer. We'll discuss how to upgrade and install hardware, how to add a second monitor, how to connect new and old hard drives, and how to add memory.

The single most helpful thing you can do to make your Windows XP computer run at peak speed is give it enough memory (or RAM, short for Random Access Memory). Just as a reminder, there are two types of memory in your computer: hard disk space and RAM. RAM is used to hold Windows and the programs you're actually using at the moment, and Windows XP wants lots more than any previous version of Windows. As we discussed in the early chapters of this book, XP is said to be capable of running with as little as 64MB of RAM, but it will run very slowly and you'll find the experience unpleasant. Memory is very inexpensive these days, and boosting your RAM up to at least 256MB will make a huge difference. I'll discuss adding RAM later in this chapter.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint