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Making WMI Connections

WMI is one of the service processes that runs “behind the scenes” in Windows. If WMI is configured as discussed in the previous section, it's always there, waiting for a client program—that is, a script or other management program—to connect to it. WMI provides COM objects that let a script interact with the underlying Windows settings and values. Figure 7.3 illustrates how this works. Your script uses WbemScripting objects that communicate with the WMI service on a selected computer through Distributed COM (DCOM). WMI returns information about the computer through the WbemScripting object's methods and properties and then saves changes back to the remote computer. The “remote computer” can be any computer on the network, even the same computer that is running the script.

Figure 7.3. A WMI client program communicates with the WMI service on a specified computer, which dips into Windows settings through WMI provider services.



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