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Chapter 5. Understanding Files and Direc... > Expanding the File System Through Su...

Expanding the File System Through Subdirectories

Earlier in this chapter, disk directories were likened to the plastic trays that many households use to organize eating utensils. The metaphor is not outlandish. This plastic tray separates similar utensils to make them easier to find; takes up very little room; and generally simplifies the storage of forks, spoons, knives, and so on. The DOS directory structure simplifies the storage of program and data files and makes them easier to find when needed.

When you use FORMAT to prepare a disk, it creates a root directory structure. The number of entries that this directory can contain is limited. On most floppy disk formats, the number of entries is limited to 512. On hard disks, the capacity is proportional to the size of the volume (logical disk) being created. There is very little chance that you will ever exceed the capacity, unless you try to store all the files on your hard disk in the root directory.


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