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Chapter 2. Starting DOS > Creating Multiple Configurations

Creating Multiple Configurations

Being able to boot your computer into one of several configurations is often handy. You might run a DOS program that requires expanded memory, for example, but nothing else you do requires EMS. If you run Windows and Windows programs most of the time, the 64KB page frame in expanded memory (EMS), also called upper memory, can be a drag on performance, so doing without the EMS is better. Maybe you have reason to log in to a network several times a day, but some of your programs object to having the network shell take up memory that they want to use. You might have any number of reasons to want different configurations at different times.

With earlier versions of DOS, you had to jump through hoops if you needed to have more than one standard configuration. A common trick was to have two or more versions of CONFIG.SYS tucked away in subdirectories or written in the boot directory with alternative names. When you needed a configuration different from your normal working environment, you had to copy one of these alternative CONFIG.SYS files into the boot directory and reboot. Changing back to your normal configuration was just as complex. No more!


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