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Chapter 11. Working with Disks and Drives > Working with Floppy Disks

Working with Floppy Disks

On the original IBM Personal Computer, the floppy disk drive was the primary storage device. In the early 1980s, most PC users ran applications directly from floppies; lucky users had a second floppy drive on which to store data. Today, as a software distribution medium, the floppy disk is practically obsolete because of its limited capacity and its relative high cost. CD-ROM drives are standard Windows peripherals today, and for good reason: A single CD can store as much data as more than 450 high-density floppy disks.

Through the years, Microsoft has added ever-so-minor improvements to floppy disk support in MS-DOS and Windows. In the early 1990s, IBM introduced a floppy disk drive standard that holds twice as much data as a standard floppy—2.88 megabytes—but like so many IBM innovations, it was not adopted by other manufacturers.


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