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Chapter 11. Working with Disks and Drives > Working with Disk Partitions

Working with Disk Partitions

As I noted in the previous section, you must create one or more partitions before Windows or DOS can store and retrieve data on a hard disk. How many partitions should you use on a given disk? I can't answer that question with a one-size-fits-all recommendation. In some cases, limitations imposed by the file system or by the system BIOS can force users to divide hard disk drives into partitions of a specific maximum size. When you create multiple partitions on a single disk and all are compatible with Windows 98, the operating system uses a different drive letter to access each partition.

Note

Is it a hard disk or a hard drive? With removable media, the issue is clear-cut: The drive is the physical device that holds the floppy disk or CD. Technically, a hard disk storage device consists of disk-shaped magnetic media, typically arranged into a stack of platters, and the drive that spins those platters and moves the heads to the appropriate position for reading and writing data. In this book, I refer to the physical device as a hard disk and use the term drive to refer to partitions and logical drives that have assigned drive letters.



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