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Chapter 24. Using and Customizing Intern... > Secrets of the Windows Masters: Usin...

Secrets of the Windows Masters: Using Windows Me's Built-In FTP Client

After Microsoft TCP/IP is installed on a computer, you have a fully functional FTP client. One of the best things about using FTP to download information over the Internet is the relatively low overhead of a file transfer versus one in a Web-style environment. When you are comfortable using FTP and become adept at the various commands used in the FTP environment, you will probably use it to accomplish most of your file downloads across the Internet. You can use the following FTP commands with Microsoft TCP/IP:

  • !— Runs the specified command on the local computer.

  • ?— Displays descriptions for FTP commands. Identical to help.

  • append— Appends a local file to a file on the remote computer, using the current file type setting.

  • ascii— Sets the file transfer type to ASCII, the default.

  • bell— Toggles a bell to ring after each file transfer command is completed. By default, the bell is off.

  • binary— Sets the file transfer type to binary.

  • bye— Ends the FTP session with the remote computer and exits FTP.

  • cd— Changes the working directory on the remote computer.

  • close— Ends the FTP session with the remote server and returns to the command interpreter.

  • debug— Toggles debugging. When debugging is on, each command sent to the remote computer is printed, preceded by the string --->. By default, debugging is off.

  • delete— Deletes files on remote computers.

  • dir— Displays a list of a remote directory's files and subdirectories.

  • disconnect— Disconnects from the remote computer, retaining the FTP prompt.

  • get— Copies a remote file to the local computer, using the current file transfer type. Identical to recv.

  • glob— Toggles filename globbing. Globbing permits the use of wildcard characters in local file or path names. By default, globbing is on.

  • hash— Toggles hash-mark (#) printing for each 2,048-byte data block transferred. By default, hash-mark printing is off.

  • help— Displays descriptions for FTP commands.

  • lcd— Changes the working directory on the local computer. By default, the current directory on the local computer is used.

  • literal— Sends arguments, verbatim, to the remote FTP server. A single FTP reply code is expected in return. Identical to quote.

  • ls— Displays an abbreviated list of a remote directory's files and subdirectories.

  • mdelete— Deletes multiple files on remote computers.

  • mdir— Displays a list of a remote directory's files and subdirectories. Enables you to specify multiple files.

  • mget— Copies multiple remote files to the local computer, using the current file transfer type.

  • mkdir— Creates a remote directory.

  • mls— Displays an abbreviated list of a remote directory's files and subdirectories.

  • mput— Copies multiple local files to the remote computer, using the current file transfer type.

  • open— Connects to the specified FTP server.

  • prompt— Toggles prompting. During multiple file transfers, FTP provides prompts to enable you to selectively retrieve or store files; mget and mput transfer all files if prompting is turned off. By default, prompting is on.

  • put— Copies a local file to the remote computer, using the current file transfer type. Identical to send.

  • pwd— Prints the current directory on the remote computer.

  • quit— Ends the FTP session with the remote computer and exits FTP.

  • quote— Sends arguments, verbatim, to the remote FTP server. A single FTP reply code is expected in return. Identical to literal.

  • recv— Copies a remote file to the local computer, using the current file transfer type. Identical to get.

  • remotehelp— Displays help for remote commands.

  • rename— Renames remote files.

  • rmdir— Deletes a remote directory.

  • send— Copies a local file to the remote computer, using the current file transfer type. Identical to put.

  • status— Displays the current status of FTP connections and toggles.

  • trace— Toggles packet tracing; displays the route of each packet when running an FTP command.

  • type— Sets or displays the file transfer type.

  • user— Specifies a user to the remote computer.

  • verbose— Toggles verbose mode. If on, all FTP responses are displayed; when a file transfer completes, statistics regarding the efficiency of the transfer are also displayed. By default, verbose is on.


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