• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 38. Remote Access with Dial-Up N... > Using Resources via Remote Access

Using Resources via Remote Access

When you dial in to a Remote Access Server and connect to the network, your workstation is essentially a normal network client with one exception: Dialing in to your network through a modem is considerably slower than when you're logged on at the office—even at today's modem speeds. Although Dial-Up Networking offers a great deal of functionality, with remote node connectivity you cannot run any sizable applications (such as Office) from the network, and you cannot transfer large amounts of data in reasonable time periods. The most effective way to use a remote node solution is to have all the applications you require resident on your Windows 98 computer and have any large documents or files on removable media. In this case, when you access your required network resources (such as a standard Word document or a Notes database), you only have to worry about passing small amounts of data back and forth across the line. Following is a list of common uses for Dial-Up Networking clients:

  • Access to Microsoft Office documents or databases

  • Access to Windows NT, Novell, or UNIX servers

  • Access to electronic mail such as Exchange or Notes

  • Access to a Notes database or an Exchange public folder

  • Access to an intranet

  • Access to the Internet (through a proxy server)


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint