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Using Shortcuts

The files you use most often are scattered across your hard disk in a number of folders. When you set up a new program, its files go in their own folders, and you organize data files using whatever system makes most sense—by project, date, or department, for example. If you had to root through folders and subfolders every time you wanted to open a document or launch a program, you'd hardly have any time to get work done.

So, how do you maintain an orderly filing system and still keep programs and documents close at hand? The solution is to use shortcuts. As the name implies, a shortcut is a pointer file that allows you to access a file without moving the file or creating a copy of it. You can create a shortcut for almost any object in Windows, including programs, data files, folders, drives, Dial-Up Networking connections, printers, and Web pages. Windows uses shortcuts extensively: Every item in the Programs folder on your Start menu is a shortcut, for example, and every time you save a Web address to your Favorites folder, you create an Internet shortcut. Learning how to create and manage shortcuts is a crucial step in mastering Windows.


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