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Chapter 2. The Design and Architecture o... > How Does Windows 2000 Professional C...

How Does Windows 2000 Professional Compare to OS/2?

If you're a Windows maverick, you probably thought OS/2 bit the dust some time ago. Nope. It's still around. At the time of this writing, IBM was still selling Warp version 4 for the client, and Warp Server/Warp Server Advanced on the server side. True, IBM has killed the software division that created and maintained the OS/2 product line, so we'll probably see a sharp falloff of sales in the ensuing years.

As mentioned in Chapter 1, OS/2 and Windows 2000 hail from similar roots. They are both multithreaded, preemptive-multitasking operating systems. However, OS/2 doesn't run 32-bit Windows programs, only 16-bit 3.x applications. It also runs only on Intel processors (or compatible processors, such as those from AMD and Cyrix), not Alpha. And it runs Win 3.x apps by actually running a copy of Windows 3.x under OS/2 (supplied in the package). OS/2 supports up to 64 processors, and IBM seems to be pushing its Internet connectivity capabilities as its biggest strength. As with NT-based products, the kernel is protected, and it sports an advanced file system (HPFS), which is much like the earlier version of NTFS. Both systems are similar in design, supporting long filenames (though NTFS is limited to 254 characters instead of 256, but who's counting). However, with Windows 2000's encryption and active directory, Windows 2000 clearly has the upper hand at this point. Windows 2000 also provides additional access controls for files and support of various redundant array of inexpensive drives (RAID) technologies such as striping and disk mirroring, which are in excess of OS/2's capabilities.


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