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Chapter 2. The Design and Architecture o... > Internetworking with Windows 2000

Internetworking with Windows 2000

Another of the major architectural design mandates for the programming team was to ensure that NT technology had networking built in and that it could internetwork with the most popular protocols and clients. Of course, NT—like its lowly 9x and even 3.11 counterparts—does include networking. Windows 2000 Professional supports peer-to-peer networking but not client/server style. Just plug in your network, hook up your cards, name your workgroup, and you're pretty much up and running (oy, it used to be so much more challenging!).

If you already have an existing network, you can probably jack your Windows 2000 Professional workstation right into it because support for all the popular protocols such as TCP/IP and NetBEUI and clients such as the Microsoft network client and Novell NetWare are included. This type of plug-and-play functionality was well implemented in NT and even better organized and expanded in Windows 2000 Professional. Whether you're interested in giving up your existing investment in another network operating system is another question, but with the move afoot in the direction of the NT server, and with the significant advantages of IntelliMirror and Active Directory services available, not to mention the diminutive price tags on kick-butt computers, large enterprisewide networks should definitely be checking out the potentially rosy bottom line for conversion to the Windows 2000 line of workstations and servers.


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