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Chapter 2. The Design and Architecture o... > Windows 2000 Architecture Close Up

Windows 2000 Architecture Close Up

As you probably surmised from the discussion thus far, Windows 2000 is a complex and capable operating system—certainly a far cry from its DOS/Windows 3.1 and Windows 9x predecessors, and even far exceeding NT 4. We've talked at some length about aspects such as IntelliMirror (page 32), Active Directory (page 32), and other high-end capabilities. Now we'll go a bit deeper into the inner workings of NT technology, discussing its architectural design and some specific differences between 16-bit Windows and Windows 2000.

An Overview of Windows 2000 Design

Now that we've looked at Windows 2000 in relation to other Microsoft operating systems, let's look at some of its inner workings. Obviously, writing 29 million lines of code wasn't undertaken lightly or handled by a small band of hack programmers. Such a project can't be undertaken lightly or without extensive forethought. Coding began only after a thorough architectural design and line of attack were agreed upon by the main programmers and system architects involved. Much of the design, coding, and thinking behind NT were the work of Dave Cutler, who, you might recall from Chapter 1, also developed an operating system for the DEC PDP-11 (called RSX-11M) and the VMS operating system that runs on the DEC VAX system.


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