• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Defining Windows 2000

As was made clear in Chapter 1, "Introducing Windows 2000 Professional," Windows 2000 is Microsoft's top-flight operating system, designed to meet the rigors of major corporations and power users, application developers, and Web servers. Though some, particularly UNIX enthusiasts, might take issue with claims about NT's capabilities, it continues to prove itself as a viable alternative to UNIX and its cousins. It's also the most obvious upgrade to the Win9x line of systems for the smaller, growing company looking for a more robust computing platform.

If you've kept up with NT during its evolution by reading magazines and Web pages, you might already know a bit, if not a lot, about how Windows NT and 2000 work, how its architecture differs from Win9x, and what its various modules do. If so, you can skip or skim this chapter. But if you find computer science interesting, read on. In this chapter, we'll talk about what makes Windows 2000 Professional tick, discuss the modules that make up Windows 2000 Professional, and describe what makes it different from other operating systems from Microsoft, notably Windows 3.x and Windows 9x.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint