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Faxing

Faxing is a function that Microsoft has dropped in and out of Windows (almost literally) for years now. Windows 95 had faxing capability built into Microsoft Exchange. When Exchange became Windows Messaging, this capability disappeared. Outlook Express didn't fax, and even though Kodak Imaging (which was supplied with Windows 98) had some fax-related features, Windows 98 didn't have native faxing capabilities, so it was meaningless. Well, finally, Windows 2000 has faxing capability built in and ready to roll.

You install and use Windows 2000's faxing feature just like most of the third-party fax programs have taught in the past—as a printer, which is called a fax printer. After the fax printer is set up, to send a fax, you simply choose to print your document to the fax printer. Choosing this option runs a wizard that prompts you to enter some information about the recipient (such as phone number), and the rasterizer optimizes the output for a fax machine rather than a printer, dials the phone, and then sends the fax image to the remote fax machine. That's all there is to it. You can even use a cover page editor and a fax management tool to view and edit your faxes, set preferences, and review logs of fax events. The good news is that you don't need a degree in Sanskrit to figure out faxing anymore. (Windows Messaging and Microsoft Exchange in the Windows 9x products were too complex, not to mention buggy.) In Windows 2000, faxing is easy.


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