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Chapter 30. Maintaining and Optimizing S... > Configuring the Program Environments

Configuring the Program Environments

Chapter 28, "Tweaking the GUI," and Chapter 29, "Customizing via Control Panel Applets," covered quite of few of the adjustments that you can make to the Windows 2000 user environment. Those chapters also addressed a variety of settings that affect the operation of Windows on a more rudimentary level, such as Properties sheets for printers and other devices you may have installed on a typical system or network. In addition to all these settings and properties, Windows 2000 allows for fine-tuning of program and system handling under the various operating system environments—32-bit Windows, 16-bit Windows, DOS, OS/2, and POSIX.

As discussed in Chapter 2, "The Design and Architecture of Windows 2000 Professional," and Chapter 3, "Getting Your Hardware and Software Ready for Windows 2000," Windows 2000 Professional runs non–NT-based applications that fall into four classes: MS-DOS, Windows 3.x, OS/2 1.x character-based, and POSIX character-based. You may remember also that this flexibility is achieved via simulated operating environments called environment subsystems. Each subsystem is basically an emulator responsible for providing the API for each operating system and then translating the API calls to the 32-bit Windows subsystem, which passes the commands onto Windows 2000 for processing.


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