• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 10. Font Management > A Little Windows Font History

A Little Windows Font History

Since the days of Windows 3.0, one of the big attractions to Windows was that it included a unified system for displaying and printing text across all Windows applications and printers. Prior to Windows, font management on the PC was a nightmare. Switching between typefaces and typestyles (italics, bold, and so on) in DOS-based applications was definitely not a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) experience. For example, in WordPerfect or Word for DOS, you often had to resort to Control-key codes for input and view color-coded characters onscreen at best. You had to remember that blue text meant bold, for example. If you had a monochrome monitor (as most were), you were limited to monocolor cues. Font size changes weren't displayed onscreen, and finer points such as kerning and justification and special effects such as outline, shadow, and so forth were out of the ballpark.

When print time came, not only were tjere typically no spoolers (you couldn't get back to work until the print job was done), but the line and page breaks you could expect to see on paper rarely paralleled what you saw onscreen. The whole process was more like WYSIMWYG (What You See Is Maybe What You'll Get) or WYSIWYW (What You See Is What You Want).


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint