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Chapter 20. Using Windows NT with the In... > Understanding the World Wide Web

Understanding the World Wide Web

The World Wide Web is the fastest growing and most exciting part of the Internet. The Web was developed in 1989 at CERN (Centre Européen de Recherche Nucléaire, which most people call the Particle Physics Research Laboratory) at the University of Berne in Switzerland. Although the rest of the Internet is text-oriented, the Web is graphics and sound-oriented. Clicking a hypertext or hypermedia link (a specially encoded text or graphics image) takes you to other documents, called Web pages, where you can view images from the Hubble telescope, visit an art museum, watch a video clip of skiers (on a ski resort's page), or hear the haunting theme song from The X Files—all on your computer.

Unlike other Internet file-retrieval systems, which are hierarchical in nature (you wind your way through descending layers of menus or directories to find what you're looking for), the Web is distributed. It offers links to other parts of the same document or other documents, which are not necessarily at the same Web site as the current document. You travel through the Web using a program called a graphical browser (such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer or Netscape's Navigator). For example, you might point and click a phrase on your screen that looks like this:


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