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Using Internet Explorer

Internet Explorer made its debut in August 1995 as part of the Plus Pack for Windows 95. Since then, updates have been available for free on the Internet. Versions of Internet Explorer have also been available for Windows 3.0, Windows NT 3.51, and now for Windows NT 4.0. Having a Web browser bundled with an operating system that ships with built-in TCP/IP support enables you to start cruising the Internet in a snap. All you need is an account on the Internet, and you're all set. Before diving too deeply into this chapter, be sure you have connectivity to the Internet from your workstation. To do so, you should have TCP/IP set up on your workstation and you should have set-up a connection to the Internet—either with an Internet Service Provider and connection through Dial-Up Networking, or via the network to which your workstation is attached.

Internet Explorer Upgrades

Microsoft is constantly working to upgrade and improve their Web browser. Since this book's first edition, Internet Explorer has been upgraded to version 3.2. Even more recently, Microsoft has released a version 4. Usability and integration with the operating system are some of the key components of this version. In addition, Push technology comes to the Internet Explorer world as version 4 allows for automatic updating of local versions of Web sites. Here are the key components of Internet Explorer 4:

Site Subscription Internet Explorer 4 enables you to review Web content offline by downloading sites you subscribe to your local PC. Internet Explorer downloads only elements of sites that have changed since the last download. This means you don't have to waste time browsing through sites that haven't changed since the last time you visited.

Smart Favorites Internet Explorer alerts you when any content at any of the sites on your list of favorites changes.

Desktop Integration With Internet Explorer, your Desktop looks and behaves much like a Web browser. Navigating between local resources and Internet resources becomes an insignificant distinction.

Web Navigation Ease A number of user-centric features make it easy to navigate through Web sites and across the Web. It's easy with Internet Explorer to move from page to page, home pages, search services, and favorite pages.



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