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Chapter 6. Managing Memory, Multitasking... > Working with Tasking and Priorities

Working with Tasking and Priorities

In the previous section, you learned about how memory is used in Windows NT Workstation and how to configure memory for best performance. Proper memory management helps your system run smoother, especially when you run more than one application at once. One of the features of Windows NT Workstation is multitasking. This feature allows you to run multiple applications and processes at once. You might say that multitasking was also a feature of earlier versions of Windows. This is true, but the multitasking capabilities of Windows NT are far superior than those of Windows 3.1 and Windows for Workgroups. This section looks at multitasking as well as how you can specify tasking priorities in Windows NT Workstation. This feature lets you specify which applications have a higher priority when more than one application is running.

Understanding Multitasking

The most important point to keep in mind about multitasking is that use of the CPU is the real issue. All applications need to use the CPU to process, so when more than one application is run at once, access to the CPU is the critical point. The differences between the multitasking schemes used by Windows 3.1 and Windows NT are related to CPU usage.


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