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Chapter 5.3. Sharing Folders > Setting Permissions On Shared Folders

Setting Permissions On Shared Folders

Different Microsoft networking products have different ways of providing security. Simple systems such as MS Net and Windows for Workgroups use password-level security, in which each shared folder has a password associated with it. The password must be supplied to connect to the folder. This does not work well on large networks. Windows NT and Windows 2000 use user-level security, in which the user supplies a name and password. Based on that, access to resources is either granted or refused. Under normal circumstances, the user will log in to the network and the network client software will supply their credentials to every server they connect to, without bothering the user again. Only if the user connects to a server that requires different logon credentials do they have to re-enter any information. The concept of Domains, which Microsoft networks have used since LAN Manager V2, was created to ensure that the same credentials are valid on all servers. Although users will not notice, in Windows 2000 the way the credentials are validated has changed with the arrival of Kerberos authentication.

Windows 2000 shared folder permissions are set for groups and/or individual users. The permissions act as filters to allow the administrator to say "Pass this kind of access from this user (or group) through to the file system."


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