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Chapter 1.2. Introduction to Active Dire... > Active Directory and Windows 2000

Active Directory and Windows 2000

In a network environment, information needs to be accessed by any number of computers on the network. Whether verifying a user's account and password, locating files and printers on the network, receiving important information from other users, or sending messages to users on other networks, there must be some place to store the information needed to make these things happen. In some organizations, users have to "look up" these kinds of pieces of information from a variety of sources on the network. To eliminate the need for users to search in multiple places for this kind of information, Windows 2000 provides a Directory service that allows Windows 2000 to store information about virtually any device or object on the network in a single database that is accessible to everyone on the network. That database is called Active Directory.

Active Directory provides information about users, computer, printers, network applications, and a variety of other objects of interest to network clients. Active Directory is the following:


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