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Overview of DNS

In the context of the Internet age, the technological counterpart to the Postal addressing system (state, city, street, block, and building) is the Domain Name Service. Not that DNS is responsible for actually transporting packets across networks; it works as a human-friendly addressing system to allow you to use host names to refer to computers you need to communicate with, rather than having to memorize the IP addresses of the hosts. On the other hand, computer systems need IP addresses if they want to send data to remote systems, and DNS is the established way for systems to translate host names into IP addresses.

DNS is the global standard for the way names are resolved to addresses on the Internet, and it is increasingly becoming the primary way names are resolved in LANs. Windows 2000 moves Microsoft toward this goal by using DNS name resolution instead of NetBIOS name resolution as the default way of resolving computer names to IP addresses in Windows 2000 Domains. DNS is also a critical service for Windows 2000 Domains because it is required for Active Directory to function.


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