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Chapter 8.7. Connection Sharing > Overview of Connection Sharing

Overview of Connection Sharing

Connecting a network to the Internet has traditionally meant doing one of two things. Either you purchase an expensive firewall/proxy device or you purchase enough live Internet addresses for all of your network's computers. Windows 2000 now offers a third alternative, Network Address Translation (NAT). NAT provides a mechanism for translating internal "private" TCP/IP addresses (into TCP/IP addresses usable on the Internet. By default, NAT only processes IP packets from the Internet that are in response to internal requests. This provides a limited form of security that may be acceptable for some networks.

To enable connection sharing, you will need at least two network interfaces—one for your internal network and one for the Internet. The connection to the Internet can be either a permanent connection, such as an Ethernet NIC, or a temporary connection, such as an ISDN modem.


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