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Chapter 2.4. Configuring Network Compone... > Troubleshooting Network Connectivity

Troubleshooting Network Connectivity

When troubleshooting network connectivity problems, never overlook the obvious. Sometimes the simple answer is the correct one. Many hours can be spent troubleshooting technical networking issues, only to discover a faulty patch cable to the wall. Table 2.4.4 lists common symptoms and their resolutions.

Table 2.4.4. Network Connectivity Troubleshooting
Symptoms Explanation/Resolution
Windows 2000 cannot see any NetWare servers.IPX frame type may be incorrectly set (802.2 is default for 3.12 and higher).
Computers nearby can be accessed,but not computers in other parts of the building or network.The default Gateway setting may be incorrectly configured.
I can access a server by its IP address, but not by its name.DNS and/or WINS may be incorrectly configured or DNS/WINS servers are unavailable or misconfigured.
Windows 2000 is configured for DHCP and my IP address is 169.254.245.174 (255.255.0.0 mask).No response from the DHCP server, or DHCP scope is out of addresses (previous versions of Windows NT would have 0.0.0.0 in this situation).
I cannot connect to a remote server. (Listed to the right are steps to effectively troubleshoot IP connectivity using the Ping.exe command line utility.) Ping the remote server by its IP address.

If it responds:

Check your name resolution settings (DNS/WINS/HOSTS file/LMHOSTS file).

DNS/WINS servers could be down or misconfigured.

If it does not respond:

Ping a different host on the remote network.

If it responds:

The original server may be unavailable or misconfigured.

If it does not respond:

Check your Default Gateway settings, IP address, and subnet mask. If they are correctly configured:

Ping your Default Gateway IP address.

If it responds:

The router may not be routing. Ping the remote, or far side router interface of your Default Gateway.

If it does not respond:

The router may not be functioning:

Ping a host on your local network or subnet.

If it responds:

The router may be down.

If it does not respond:

Ping the Loopback address (127.0.0.1)

If it responds:

Check your network cables, connectors, and link lights on the network interface card.

If it does not respond:

Remove and reinstall networking (local protocol stack or files may be corrupt).



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