• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 11. Using File Permissions and A... > Applying Advanced Resource Control U...

Applying Advanced Resource Control Using ACLs

New with Tiger, Apple has added Access Control Lists (ACLs) to the choices a user or administrator has in defining who can do what with a file. ACLs provide significantly more power than traditional Unix permissions. Where a traditional permission set can only detail what's allowable for the owner, the group, or “everyone else” for a particular file, an ACL can be so detailed as to individually define the permissions that are available for each user on the system. The types of permissions that are available are likewise considerably more fine-grained than the read/write/execute permissions controlled by the traditional Unix permissions system.

Understanding ACLs

Despite the considerable additional flexibility that ACLs provide, they are surprisingly simple to manipulate and understand. The primary commands for working with them are the chmod command, and the ls command with the -e flag. The former sets ACL entries, and the -e flag to ls cause it to list ACL entries for files it shows. The syntax is also simple:


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint