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Chapter 20. Configuring Advanced Multius... > Using and Sharing Disk Resources wit...

Using and Sharing Disk Resources with NFS

In this section, we demonstrate ways that your Mac OS X machine can share resources with other Unix machines using NFS, the Network File System. We demonstrate two ways to set up your Mac OS X machine as an NFS client and one way to use it as an NFS server.

A Common Way to Set Up the Tiger NFS Client

In this section, we demonstrate a common method for setting up an NFS client on a Mac OS X machine. We show you this method because you will regularly see references to this type of code, for this and other NetInfo-related activities, on the Internet. Sometimes this type of method is the only method you can choose, so you need to be familiar with it. Sometimes, though, an alternative method might work better. For your Mac OS X machine to be a client machine, there has to be another Unix machine that is an NFS server. In other words, there has to be a Unix machine (Mac OS X or another flavor of Unix) on your network that is willing to export one of its filesystems to your Mac OS X machine. So, you cannot just set up your machine as a client and assume that everything will work fine. Discuss your interest in being able to use your Mac OS X machine to access a filesystem on another Unix machine with that machine's system administrator. There is a security risk involved, particularly for the other machine, when it shares its resources with your machine. Therefore, in that machine's interest, the system administrator might not be willing to export its filesystems to your machine.


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