• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 10. Common Unix Shell Commands: ... > Understanding Tiger, HFS+, and BSD C...

Understanding Tiger, HFS+, and BSD Command Interaction

To the novice Unix user—especially one coming from a GUI environment as nice as the Mac's—venturing into the Unix filesystem will probably feel like a journey back to the Stone Age. Files upon files, nothing to indicate what any of them do, and not a friendly icon in sight. Although the filesystem might initially appear cryptic and primitive, you will find that with experience, it actually affords you considerable sophistication and control. This sophistication comes from the ability to combine the functions of many small programs into larger programs with arbitrarily complex functions.

Before the use of most Unix commands will make sense, you need to understand a few things about the design of the standard Unix filesystem, and the ways that the Mac OS X HFS+ filesystem differs. Apple doesn't strictly adhere to the model that most forms of Unix use, but from the point of view of the BSD subsystem, it functions similarly enough that almost everything works without modification. You'll find a number of differences between the way Unix thinks of files, and what you're probably used to, but after you get used to them, you'll probably find these differences are to your liking.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint