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Fonts Have Style

Because of the design of documents, the way that Windows displays documents is critical to your viewing of them. The documents must be easy to read. If Windows doesn't automatically display a document in a format that is easy to read, you'll have to change the way the document appears. Perhaps the simplest way to make a document easier to read, no matter what tool you use to view those documents, is by changing the document's font. A font is the typeface Windows uses to display a character. If you see two letter A's on the screen and one is larger, more slanted, bolder, fancier, or more scripted, you are looking at two different fonts.

Fonts from the same font family contain the same typeface (they look alike), but they come in standard formatting versions such as italicized, boldfaced, and underlined text. Therefore, an italicized font named Courier and a boldfaced font named Courier both belong to the same font family, even though they look different because of the italicized version of the one and the boldface version of the other. A font named Algerian and a font named Symbol, however, would belong to two different font families; not only do they look different, but they also come in various styles.


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