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Part: VI Server/Network Administration > Remote Access and Administration

Chapter 26. Remote Access and Administration

In This Chapter

Apple advertises that with OS X, you now have the power of Unix. With the power of Unix also come some unfamiliar security issues. Many Unix machines run various types of services, such as telnet, which increase your machine's vulnerability to attacks from crackers. In general, crackers are interested in either wiping your machine or installing a packet sniffer that saves passwords transmitted on your network for future devious uses. To keep your machine most secure, you should not hook it up to the Internet. Given that that solution is rather impractical in an age in which Internet communication is one of the many reasons why people buy computers, it becomes your responsibility to pay attention to security issues, if not for yourself, for the other machines on your network.

Fortunately, Apple realizes that Macintosh users are not used to worrying about security issues. In fact, Macintosh users have always had the luxury of knowing that their Macintosh is practically impenetrable. So, unlike some Unix operating systems, OS X ships with all the services turned off. You have to decide, as you start using your machine more, which services, if any, you should try to turn on. Remember that the more services you turn on, the more vulnerable your machine becomes.


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