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mount

mount

mount Mounts file systems.
mount

mount [-Aadfruvw] [-t <type>]

mount [-dfruvw] <special> | <node>

mount [-dfruvw] [-o <options>] [-t <type>] <special> | <node>
								

mount invokes a file system-specific program to prepare and graft the <special> device or remote node (rhost:path) on the file system tree at the point <node>. If neither <special> nor <node> is specified, the appropriate information is taken from the fstab file.
The system maintains a list of currently mounted file systems. If no arguments are given to mount, this list is displayed.
-A Causes mount to try to mount all the file systems listed in the fstab except those for which the noauto option is specified.
-a Similar to -A flag, except that if a file system (other than the root file system) appears to be mounted already, mount does not try to mount it again. mount assumes that a file system is already mounted if a file system of the same type is mounted on a given mount point.
-d Causes everything to be done except the invocation of the file system–specific program. This option is useful in conjunction with the -v option to determine what the mount command is trying to do.
-f Forces the revocation of write access when trying to downgrade a file system mount status from read-write to read-only.
-r Mounts the file system read-only (even root may not write to it). The same as the rdonly option to the -o option.
-u Indicates that the status of an already mounted file system should be changed. Any of the options available in -o may be changed. The file system may be changed from read-only to read-write, or vice versa. An attempt to change from read-write to read-only fails if any files on the file system are currently open for writing unless -f is also specified.
-v Enables verbose mode.
-w Sets the file system object to read-write.
-t <type> Specifies the file system type as <type>. Default is type ffs. The option can be used to indicate the actions should be performed only on the specified file system <type>. More than one type may be specified in a comma-separated list. The prefix no added to the type list may be used to specify that the actions should not take place on <type>. For example, mount -a -t nonfs,mfs indicates that all file systems should be mounted except those of type NFS and MFS. mount attempts to execute a program called mount_XXX where XXX is the specified <type>.
-o Specifies certain options. The options are specified in a comma-separated list.
The following options are available for the -o option:
async Specifies that all I/O to the file system should be done asynchronously. This is a dangerous flag to set, and should not be used without being prepared to re-create the file system if the system crashes.
force Same as -f. Forces the revocation of write access when trying to downgrade a file system mount status from read-write to read-only.
noatime Does not update atime on files in the system unless mtime or ctime is being changed as well. This option is useful for laptops or news servers on which the extra disk activity associated with updating the atime is not wanted.
noaccesstime Synonym for noatime. Provided for compatibility with other operating systems.
nodev Does not interpret character or block special devices on the file system. The option is useful for a server that has file systems containing special devices for architectures other than its own.
noexec Does not allow the execution of any binaries on the mounted file system. This option is useful for a server containing binaries for an architecture other than its own.
nosuid Does not allow set-user-identifier or set-group-identifier bits to take effect.
rdonly Same as -r. Mounts the file system read-only. Even root may not write to it.
sync Specifies that all I/O to the file system should be done asynchronously.
update Same as -u. Indicates that the status of an already mounted file system should be changed.
union Causes the namespace at the mount point to appear as the union of the mounted file system root and the existing directory. Lookups are done on the mounted file system first. If operations fail due to a nonexistent file, the underlying file system is accessed instead. All creates are done in the mounted file system.
Any additional options specific to a given file system type may be passed as a comma-separated list. The options are distinguished by a leading -. Options that take a value have the syntax -option=value.



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