• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Fill In the Holes

Disk Defragmenter fills empty gaps on your disks. As you add and delete files, the deleted space leaves free holes around the disk. Over time, your disk response time will slow down as you add or delete document files to and from the disk drive.

Pick Up the Pieces

Windows XP can store large files on a fragmented disk as long as there is enough free fragmented space to hold the file. Windows stores the files in linked chunks across the disk drive, filling in fragments and linking them.

A large file is stored as one continuous file if enough space exists to do so. But often, Windows tries to reuse fragment space left over from a deleted file. Over time, the number of these file fragments can grow considerably and slow down your PC when you access a file that's fragmented.

Disk access slows down on a fragmented disk drive because Windows must jump to each file fragment when retrieving a file. If you run Disk Defragmenter often enough (once or twice a month for the average user ought to be enough), Windows keeps the fragments to a minimum and, thus, increases the disk access speed.



PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint