• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 30. Remote Computing with Dial-U... > Dial-Up Networking Fundamentals

Dial-Up Networking Fundamentals

In Chapter 26, “Getting Started with Modem Communications,” I showed how your computer can exchange data with remote machines by attaching a modem to the serial port and by running a phone line to the modem. In Chapter 28, “Setting Up Windows 98 for Networking,” I showed you how your computer can exchange data with machines on a network by inserting a network interface card (NIC) inside the computer and by running a network cable to the card.

Dial-Up Networking is an amalgam of these two technologies. It gives you access to a network, but a modem and phone line replace the NIC and cable. Your network access is identical to that of a machine attached directly to the network: You log on with your username and password, you can browse and use shared resources, you can share your local resources, you can access the Internet if your network has the appropriate connection, you can retrieve mail, and so on. The main difference is that, because you're using a serial port and modem as the network connection point, data transfers are much slower.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint