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16. Terminal: Doorway to Unix > Terminal’s Window Preferences

Terminal’s Window Preferences

Like most applications, Terminal has a Preferences command. Among other things, it’s one way to switch from bash to a different shell. (Turn on “Execute this command” and then type /bin/bash for bash, or /bin/csh for tsch. Then open a new Terminal window.)

Power Users’ Clinic: .term Files

Once you’ve got a few windows open—your main Terminal window, a couple of man (user-manual) windows, a top window showing all the running programs (Figure 17-3), and so on—you may get dizzy just looking at the seas of black-on-white type. One easy solution is to customize the colors, fonts, and positions of your favorite windows, and then make Terminal take a snapshot of that configuration.

A Terminal .term file stores the size, location, and visible/invisible status of all windows that are open when you create the .term file. It also stores each window’s preference settings, including its Font, Title Bar, and Colors settings. (It doesn’t store any text in these windows.) Once you’ve saved a startup file, you can open it again anytime to replicate your saved window layout in Terminal.


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