• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
System Restore \windows\system32\restore\rstrui.exe

Roll back your computer’s configuration to an earlier state, with the intention of undoing a potentially harmful change.

To Open

Start Programs Accessories System Tools System Restore

System Information Tools menu System Restore

System Configuration Utility Launch System Restore

Command Prompt \windows\system32\restore\rstrui

Description

System Restore is a feature that runs invisibly in the background, continuously backing up important system files and registry settings. The idea is that at some point, you may wish to roll back your computer’s configuration to a time before things started going wrong (see Figure 4-98). By default, System Restore is turned on, using up to 12 percent of your computer’s hard disk space.

Figure 4-98. Use System Restore to roll back your computer’s configuration to a time before a specific problem occurred


Normally, you’ll never need to use System Restore. In fact, if you back up your entire system often (see “Backup”, earlier in this chapter), you could easily disable the System Restore feature altogether. However, if you install an application that turns out to wreak havoc, or if your system is attacked by a virus, you may be glad you had System Restore.

To configure System Restore, click “System Restore Settings” in the main System Restore window or go to Control Panel [Performance and Maintenance] System System Restore tab.

Here you can turn off the feature, change the amount of disk space that is used, and view the status of the System Restore service. If you decrease the disk space made available to System Restore (which is understandable, as 12 percent is a lot), you’ll be reducing the number of available “restore points,” theoretically reducing the effectiveness of this tool.

System Restore indiscriminately replaces files installed in your computer with potentially earlier versions, resets registry preferences, and in some cases, uninstalls software. While the intention is to solve some problems, it can inadvertently cause others. If you suspect that a particular application is causing a problem, your best bet is to uninstall that single application rather than attempting a System Restore. Use System Restore as a last resort only.


Start the System Restore application if you wish to restore an earlier configuration or create a restore point. Restore Points are packages containing files and settings, created at regular intervals. To roll back your computer’s configuration, simply choose a date when a restore point was created. You can also create a restore point at any time to “lock in” today’s configuration.

See Also

“Backup”

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint